Our People in the Community

Shelley Rowan, Vice President of Prevention and Service Delivery is pictured above receiving her award, with HRM Councillor Tim Outhit (left), and Mayor Mike Savage

Shelley Rowan, Vice President of Prevention and Service Delivery is pictured above receiving her award, with HRM Councillor Tim Outhit (left), and Mayor Mike Savage

Shelley Rowan

Each year, the City of Halifax recognizes the extraordinary contributions of individuals and groups who volunteer their time and skills to make a difference in our communities. Shelley Rowan, VP Prevention and Service Delivery, was recognized in April 2017 for her 10 years of leadership at Threads of Life. Kate Kennington, manager of family support for the organization, nominated Shelley for her role and guidance, especially when Threads of Life was in a pivotal point of development. “For more than 10 years, she was there when a listening ear was required,” says Kennington. “Shelley also has an understanding of the needs of family members and would not stray away from an opportunity to listen to a difficult family story.” Though she no longer sits on the board of directors, Shelley remains dedicated to Threads of Life and their vision to lead and inspire a culture shift as a result of which work-related injuries, illnesses and deaths are morally, socially and economically unacceptable. Shelley’s award was also bestowed for her work on the board of governors at Mount Saint Vincent University and the council of governors for the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety. 
 

Education and Research Consultant Tracey Leary leads the WCB’s work with partners maintaining support to safety curriculum in Nova Scotia’s high schools and career colleges

Education and Research Consultant Tracey Leary leads the WCB’s work with partners maintaining support to safety curriculum in Nova Scotia’s high schools and career colleges

Tracey Leary
Each year, the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) recognizes an organization that shares its dedication to providing education about vision health for Canadians. In October 2017, Education and Research Consultant Tracey Leary accepted the CNIB’s Outstanding Community Partner award on behalf of WCB Nova Scotia for supporting CNIB’s workshops on eye safety and injury prevention. Thanks to the partnership between the WCB, the Department of Labour and Advanced Education and NSCC, more than 900 students across 15 campuses are now better informed about eye protection, injury prevention and their safety rights as workers. “We were so pleased to be involved in a partnership that grew out of the Workplace Safety Strategy,” says Leary. “It continues to be essential that we reach young people at the developmental phases of their careers so they can carry the message about safety with them for life.”

WCB Nova Scotia employees and their families deliver gifts for the Angel Tree Program

WCB Nova Scotia employees and their families deliver gifts for the Angel Tree Program

The Angel Tree
WCB Nova Scotia employees have big hearts. During the holiday season, our teams shine especially bright. This year, more than 180 bags of gifts were delivered to families in need through the Salvation Army’s Angel Tree program, which matches families who could use a little extra help around the holidays, with generous donors hoping to light up a few faces on Christmas morning. In 2017, more than 2,000 children received gifts through the program. Nora Smith, who has acted as a liaison for the WCB and the Salvation Army for 20 years, says the program really brings out the kindness of WCB staff. In addition to donating to the Angel Tree program, this year, teams also put together gift baskets for a raffle, which raised more than $3,000 for Feed Nova Scotia.